Category: Bassam Tariq

30 Mosques: Ramadan Roadtrip 2011 Plans!

Bassam Tariq and Aman Ali, 30 mosques co-founders.

Aman Ali and Bassam Tariq are gearing up for their 30 mosque Ramadan Roadtrip 2011 – their plan is to visit Alaska, Hawaii and the other states that the missed on the first trip. 30 mosques, 30 states, 30 days – all during Ramadan in the month of August.  Knowing these guys as I do, they’ll do it despite the exhausting schedule!  But, as the expression goes, it takes a village and therefore I’m blogging about it to ask for you to help spread the word.

Here is a video of Aman and Bassam talking about the 2011 plan:

Here is how you can donate to the project:   No amount is too small: $5, $10 or whatever you can afford!  Just know that your donation will go toward the sharing of authentic stories about Muslims in America.

Meeting Aman and Bassam in 2010 at a local mosque was one of the highlights of my own personal exploration of spirituality in America. It helped me to address my own stereotypes and to better understand myself, my country and Islam.

I have had the honor of bringing Aman and Bassam to campuses across the US this past year. You can read more about the response people had to their presentations across the country.  Needless to say, we were all humbled by the grace of their message and their wisdom that extends well beyond their years.

If you are interested in booking the 30 mosques presentation at your college, university or organization, click here or email [email protected]

Meanwhile, I’d like to thank Aman and Bassam for inspiring so many of us.  They have even inspired me to explore my own road trip!  Any ideas?  (I’m serious!) 🙂

Reflections on the 30 Mosques Project

Aman Ali from 30 mosques

I received an email from Aman Ali, co-founder of the 30 mosques project. He shared the following note from a college sophomore in North Carolina who saw his 30 mosques in 30 days presentation:

“Dear Aman and Bassam:  I attended Aman’s presentation at “X” University the other night to, I must admit, merely fulfill a requirement for a class. I am a lifelong Christian and I hate to say I don’t know much about Islam. To say I was enlightened by your presentation would be an understatement. I was profoundly moved by the experiences you shared with my fellow students, citizens, and me. I hope I get a chance to see one or both of you speak again, because the hour and half I spent hearing about 30 Mosques in 30 Days was absolutely worth failing a quiz the next day. Keep up the good work, and if you haven’t already, I hope you get the chance to visit my hometown, Milwaukee.”

Aman Ali and Bassam Tariq are two young guys who had an idea: Visit 30 mosques in 30 states in 30 days over Ramadan 2010.  They looked for funding, rented a car and mapped out a plan. They made some calls, sent some emails, packed up the car and hit the road. They had no idea what to expect, but were ready for an adventure.

Bassam Tariq presenting in Prague, Czech Republic

I met up with them on day six of their journey, interviewed them and blogged about it. During those thirty days last summer, I checked their blog, daily, to learn more about the people that they were meeting along the way. Aman and Bassam became teachers to me and thousands around the world as they racked up the miles, slept on couches across the country, and broke fast with strangers who quickly became friends. CNN caught wind of their trip and joined them on the road for two days. And when “30 mosques” ended up on the home page of CNN, Aman and Bassam just keep “truckin’ on” in their humble fashion.

I met up again recently with Aman when he presented at a local college (solo on this occasion.) His audience this time was primarily from the campus’ Muslim Student Association.  After his presentation (see a 2 minute clip below), I spoke with some of the young people in the audience. Some had heard about 30 mosques, others had no clue what the project was before that night.  But this audience did have something in common – they were overjoyed to hear a presentation that allowed them to swell with pride. The students were truly astonished by what Aman shared about the history and diversity of Muslims in the United States. Several expressed to me how frustrating it is been to have to regularly defend their religion. Aman’s presentation gave them a reminder that is was okay to feel proud.  It was more than okay – it confirmed that there was much to be proud of! They had been eager for meaningful dialogue that did not include having to defend Islam, and the 30 mosques project provided it.

After a recent 30 mosques presentation in the mid-west (US), I received the following feedback from the the college’s Global Opportunities office:

“It was awesome Missy!  The students, staff and faculty who attended were very touched by their presentation. I’m still reflecting on their experiences and I feel a great sense of hope that I haven’t had in a long time. Some of my colleagues want to keep in touch with them, follow their work and even visit them some day in New York!”

I remembered why I created the Melibee speaking series after meeting Aman and Bassam: It was because I felt inspired by their project and wanted to share it with others.

As an educator that spent many years behind a desk on a college campus, I know how many hours it takes to meet and exceed all of your students’ needs, let alone find motivating speakers that will challenge your students to think about their role in the world AND who will make them want to learn more about a subject.  I wanted to find speakers who would move students (and faculty/staff) to put their smart phones away for 90 minutes because they would be so truly engaged by what they were hearing.

Why? Because they would be inspired. Inspired enough to not care about their email and Facebook for a whole ninety minutes.

As I reflect on the 30 mosques project, I am so grateful to Aman and Bassam for their adventurous spirits, their humble dispositions, their generosity (they will be volunteering for two days at the model UN in NYC), and for reminding me how much young people have to offer to those of us behind a desk each day. This project has offered the gift of inspiration, and it comes through the hearts of two Muslim New Yorkers – two guys who write for a living but took a month off for a really cool road trip. Needless to say, these two were raised by parents who supported their kids’ goals and dreams, one mosque at a time.

Please enjoy this clip of Aman talking about his visit to the mosque in Ross, North Dakota:

Aman Ali from 30 Mosques – 2 minute Presentation from Melibee Global on Vimeo.

Here is more information about their visit to Ross, North Dakota from Day 22 of their 30 day journey.

Aman and Bassam are available to speak from March – July 2010 (in the US and abroad.)  They are also able to present in the NYC area during the week of September 11, 2011. (Note: They are not “9/11 speakers,” as the events of that day are not what sparked them to create 30mosques.) Aman and Bassam are not sure yet if they will present after September 2011. If you’re interested in booking Aman and Bassam for a presentation, please email me at [email protected] or via the contact form.  Other inspiring Melibee speakers can be found here.


30 Mosques Project: What’s Next for Aman Ali and Bassam Tariq

Aman Ali of 30 mosques presenting at Murray State University (Kentucky)

During IEW, Aman Ali and Bassam Tariq gave their 2 hour presentation about their “Ramadan Roadtrip: 30 mosques/30 days/30 states” at several colleges.  I received terrific feedback about how they created meaningful dialogue about Muslims in the US.  (You can read more of my postings about their project and can watch the interview I did with them.)

Aman and Bassam sent this video “shout out” while on the road last week. (I thought it was particularly appropriate that they’re driving while filming  –  a big part of their 30 mosques adventure.)

During Ramadan 2011, the guys will be visiting the 20 states that they didn’t visit during this past Ramadan Roadtrip.  That primarily means they’ll be in the midwest, west coast and Alaska/Hawaii!

If you are interested in booking Aman and Bassam to speak about their experiences traveling across the US to learn about other Muslims in America, please feel free to contact me. They are available from February – July 2011 and during the week of September 11th, 2011, then again beginning in October 2011.  They can also speak outside of the US;  In fact they just returned from a speaking engagement at the US Department of State’s Youth Leadership Conference in Prague, Czech Republic.

Melibee Global has been assisting them with bookings at no additional cost (beyond their standard speaking fee) to the universities/conferences. I speak with Aman/Bassam regularly, so am happy to facilitate getting them to your campus or conference…and even you’re commencement!

Please share this posting with others in your life who may be interested in their 2 hour multimedia presentation (which includes Q&A.)  And make sure you mention that you heard about this wonderful project through Melibee Global, especially after their shout out!

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Muslim “Garb” and the Firing of Juan Williams

Flying While MuslimThere has been a slew of debate about the recent firing of Juan Williams (from NPR) for his comments about Muslims made on the Bill O’Reilly show.  Here is the quote that prompted NPR to “can” him:

“I mean, look, Bill, I’m not a bigot. You know the kind of books I’ve written about the civil rights movement in this country. But when I get on a plane, I’ve got to tell you, if I see people who are in Muslim garb and I think, you know, they’re identifying themselves first and foremost as Muslims, I get worried. I get nervous.”

Hmmmm….where does one begin?

1)  Ignorance is still alive and well in America.  (And keep in mind, the definition of ignorance IS:  “lack of knowledge, information or education.”  I’m going to assume that Mr. Williams simply didn’t understand how completely offensive his statement is.

2)  I wonder if he gets nervous when other people express their spirituality.  For example, when a Christian wears a cross on a chain on his/her neck, does this worry him?  Or when a Jew wears a yarmulke, does he get freaked out?  What about a Jain wearing a mask?  Or better yet, since some people consider sports worthy of worship, I’m guessing he gets very nervous in airports around the time the New York Yankees make it to the baseball playoffs.  They do have some pretty rowdy fans after all.  (You get my point….)

3) And what exactly is “Muslim garb”?  Some brilliant person put together a wonderful sequence of photos on the web site “Muslims Wear Things” to illustrate how ridiculous the use of the term “Muslim garb” actually is.  (Kudos to those folks!)

4) Mr. Williams lives in the USA and works for a publicly funded American media outlet.  Yes, we have freedom of speech here. It is not up to me to determine if he should or shouldn’t have been fired – that will end up in the courts. But what is my role, as a US citizen, to take a few minutes out of my day to again encourage anyone who listens to the media to carefully consider the impact of his words.  He has stated that he fears Muslims on planes.  Is it a coincidence that a lot of news outlets have planted that seed, watered it and given it plenty of media sunlight to grow? I say SHAME ON THEM.

I have Muslim friends.  I have been to mosques.  I have broken fast with Muslims during their holy month.  I am NOT afraid of Muslims and I am certainly NOT afraid to get on a plane with them.

I do, however, have concerns about getting on planes with the following:

1) people who don’t bathe enough for my standards.

2) people who bathe themselves in cologne/perfume.  That is painful to sit next to. It makes my nose run, my ears hurt, gives me migraines, and at times, sends me to the hospital or bed for days.

3) planes with not very good pilots or grumpy air crew.

4) planes that look like they haven’t been cleaned or maintained in a reasonable standard.

5) planes that insist on taking off when there is a torrential rain storm.

6) and finally, planes full of ignorant people.

Sigh…..

Ok, I’ll say it again.  Read up on the project by the 30mosques.com guys.  If you really want to know what it is like to get on a plane with a Muslim, you can ask Aman and Bassam…heck, they travel a lot! And if you’re interested in bringing them to your campus for a presentation about their 30 mosques in 30 days in 30 states roadtrip, contact me and I’ll be happy to facilitate a booking at no additional fee to Melibee.

Peace.

Aman Ali and Bassam Tariq, 30 mosques (photo courtesy of "the guys")

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